Career Counseling and Assessments

Whether students enter the University of Tennessee with a declared major or as exploratory status, many will change majors at least once before a degree is granted. With so many possibilities available and a lifetime of work ahead, Career Services encourages all students to invest time in planning to achieve academic and career success.

Career Counseling

You can meet with a Career Counselor to discuss your major and career options. Together you can decide what next steps are best for you. Call us at 974-5435 to make an appointment. We are open Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm.

Career Assessments

The process of choosing a major or career often begins with self-assessment. Consider taking one of the assessments described below to learn more about your Interests, Personality, Skills & Abilities, and Values. After taking one or more assessments, meet with a career counselor to discuss your results and generate ideas for majors and careers to research. Keep in mind that no single test can tell you “what you should be” and that successful career planning may require more than one appointment.

  • Strong Interest Inventory
    Students who are choosing or changing majors or need assistance clarifying their career goals may find The Strong Interest Inventory (SII) ® a helpful starting point. The SII is one of the most widely used and respected career planning tools. This 291-item assessment compiles your interest patterns and compares them to satisfied professionals in various occupations. Upon meeting with a career counselor to review your results, you will learn which areas interest you the most and how they relate to majors at UT.
    UT Knoxville Career Services offers the SII free of charge for students. UT Alumni may take the SII for a $30 fee. Alumni are encouraged to contact a Career Services staff member to discuss if the SII is a good option for their needs.
    Request the SII username/password by contacting 865-974-5435 or utcareer@utk.edu. Once you take the SII online, call to schedule an appointment with a career counselor who will review your results with you. Please note that results are only provided during the appointment.
  • Type Focus
    TypeFocus assesses your personality type based on four preference scales. Learn about your type and how it relates to possible career options. Through TypeFocus you can also take brief interest and values assessments, explore occupations and set goals. These assessments are self-directed, and you will receive your results immediately. UT students can discuss their results with a career counselor.
    To request the site password, Call 974-5435 or email utcareer@utk.edu
  • COMPASS by Woofound
    This short and quick visual assessment helps you discover careers based on your personality and preferences.  You can discuss your results with a career counselor, but COMPASS does not require an interpretation appointment.  After taking the assessment, visit Majors and Careers by interest to learn how your personality description relates to majors at UT.  Login to COMPASS with your current UT email address (@utk.edu).
  • Values Inventory Worksheet
    People tend to feel most satisfied when their work is congruent with their values. Work values include characteristics about jobs and work environments such as salary, amount of independence, required hours, etc. Lifestyle values characterize on preferences such as living in a particular geographic locale, maintaining family responsibilities, spending time in recreation, etc. Print and complete the checklist to help prioritize your values. There are no right or wrong answers.
    As you research potential majors and careers, consider whether or not they fit your values. You can make an appointment with a career counselor if you would like to discuss your findings.
  • Skills Checklist
    At the college level and beyond, it’s difficult to objectively measure your skills through a test. Completing the attached checklist will allow you to self-rate your skills and abilities. As you research careers of interests, consider the required skills and whether or not these are skills you feel you possess or could develop. Other ways to identify your skills include reflection on your personal accomplishments, classroom performance in various subjects, previous jobs or volunteer positions held, and feedback you receive from others.